Etude House Sunprise Mild Airy Finish UV Protection Review

Sunprise Mild Airy Finish mineral sunscreen from Etude House has an SPF of 50 and claims to have a nonsticky, nongreasy, milk formula that offers long-lasting UV protection safe and is for sensitive skin.

Directions state to shake well and apply to sun-exposed areas of the face and body, layering if exposed to the sun throughout the day.

Ingredients: Water, Cyclopentasiloxane, Zinc Oxide, Alcohol, Dicaprylyl Ether, Dipropylene Glycol, Titanium Dioxide, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Viscum Album (Mistletoe) Leaf Extract, Portulaca Oleracea Extract, Centella Asiatica Extract, Opuntia Ficus-Indica Extract, Carex Humillis Root Extract, Citrus Aurantium Bergamia (Bergamot) Fruit Oil, Citrus Limon (Lemon) Peel Oil, Eucalyptus Globulus Leaf Oil, Pinus Sylvestris Leaf Oil, Citrus Aurantifolia (Lime) Oil, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Peel Oil, Euterpe Oleracea Fruit Extract, Malpighia Emarginata (Acerola) Fruit Extract, Terminalia Ferdinandiana Fruit Extract, Echium Plantagineum Seed Oil, Adansonia Digitata Seed Oil, Hyaluronic Acid, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Cardiospermum Halicacabum Flower/Leaf/Vine Extract, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil Unsaponifiables, Vinyl Dimethicone/Methicone Silsesquioxane Crosspolymer, Peg-10 Dimethicone, Cyclomethicone, Magnesium Sulfate, Polymethylsilsesquioxane, Methicone, 1,2-Hexanediol, Aluminum Hydroxide, Methyl Methacrylate Crosspolymer, Caprylyl Glycol, Octyldodecanol, Dimethicone, Stearic Acid, Glyceryl Caprylate, Polyglyceryl-6 Polyricinoleate, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Butylene Glycol, Triethoxycaprylylsilane, Cellulose Gum

Alcohol is the third ingredient (when listed as “alcohol,” implies denatured alcohol) that gives formulas a quick dry, weightless feel on the skin. This contains 20 different vegetable ingredients to enhance sun protection. This has citrus oils of lemon, orange, bergamot and lime; depending on how these oils are processed, they can be irritating and photosensitive. Looking at a segment on the Mad Hippie website, if citrus oils are steam distilled, it should not be a worry.

Sunprise is a thin lotion that smells like it would be irritating to the skin; like a lemon-flavored alcoholic drink. On application, it goes on smoothly, it is not sticky, heavy or greasy and doesn’t require much dry-down time. It doesn’t feel heavy on the skin; I can’t feel it on my face, but can feel a light layer to the touch – this feeling lasts all day. I’ve been using Retin-A for the last few months and when applied, my skin feels slightly warm for a couple seconds, but does not sting or get more red. It is very slightly mattifying on my oily skin, so my face doesn’t look as shiny. This sunscreen does not feel drying. It is not irritating around the eyes.

It doesn’t leave much, if any, white cast; my skin tone looks slightly more pale in the mirror, but hardly noticeable.

The sunscreen enhances the dry patches by my mouth and chin.

I’ve been using this for about 2 months and have not gotten any unusual breakouts. I usually apply a second layer to my cheek bones where I get hyperpigmentation from the sun. As a sunscreen, this seems to work; I got no other redness and did not seem to get more tanned.

I wanted to see how foundation performs over the sunscreen; I use a natural-looking, satin finish foundation that I applied about 5 minutes after the sunscreen. The sunscreen seemed to mix with the foundation and made me look quite pale. It did dry down to a more normal color after about 10 minutes. Next time I waited about 20 minutes between sunscreen application and foundation and it also mixed together. I was able to use The Ordinary sun care as a primer; the Sunprise would need a primer over top if putting on a more liquid foundation.

To remove, I use an oil based cleanser followed by a gel cleanser or two cleanses with a gel cleanser.

I would repurchase the Sunprise Mild Airy Finish mineral sunscreen. It is not heavy or greasy and leaves minimal, if any, white cast. It does, however, enhance dry patches and mixes with liquid foundations that have a thin formula.

Thank you for reading.

The Ordinary Suncare Mineral UV Filters SPF 30 With Antioxidants Review

The Ordinary Suncare SPF 30 claims to offer lightweight mineral SPF protection (micronized titanium dioxide (5.44%) and zinc oxide (14.03%)) with antioxidants, anti-irritation and hydration in a noncomedogenic silicone base. To note, this is not labelled as having broad spectrum UV protection (protecting from UVA and UVB rays), as Deciem apparently did not test for it, but there is a high percentage of zinc oxide, so one can presume that it protects from UVA waves.

Ingredients: Aqua (Water), Cyclopentasiloxane, Zinc Oxide, Titanium Dioxide, PEG-10 Dimethicone, Glycerin, Helianthus Annuus Seed Oil, PEG-9 Polydimethylsiloxyethyl Dimethicone, Hexyl Laurate, Polyglyceryl-4 Isostearate, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Dimethicone/PEG-10/15 Crosspolymer, Astaxanthin, Disodium Uridine Phosphate, Ethyl Ferulate, Rosmarinus Officinalis Leaf Extract, Tasmannia Lanceolata Fruit/Leaf Extract, Haematococcus Pluvialis Extract, Picea Mariana Bark Extract, Arginine, Aspartic Acid, Glycine, Alanine, Serine, Valine, Isoleucine, Proline, Threonine, Histidine, Phenylalanine, Sodium PCA, PCA, Sodium Lactate, Glucose, Maltose, Fructose, Trehalose, Urea, Allantoin, Sodium Hyaluronate, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid, Phytosteryl Canola Glycerides, Palmitic Acid, Stearic Acid, Isochrysis Galbana Extract, Lysolecithin, Lecithin, Triolein, Pentylene Glycol, Dipropylene Glycol, Polyglyceryl-10 Oleate, Polyglyceryl-5 Trioleate, Polyglyceryl-10 Stearate, Tocopherol, Alumina, Citric Acid, Trisodium Ethylenediamine Disuccinate, Sodium Chloride, Sodium Hydroxide, Phenoxyethanol, Chlorphenesin. 

The antioxidants in the formula neutralize free radicals, protect from UV exposure and minimize the intensity of UV radiation penetrating the skin. The biosugar complex increases the skin’s ability to hold water and provide short and long term hydration. The lipids restore a compromised skin barrier and prevent water loss. Tasmanian pepperberry calms skin.

Directions state to apply liberally 20 minutes before sun exposure, reapply every 2 hours when in continued sun exposure and after water and sweat exposure. This sunscreen is not water resistant.

I have medium toned, oily skin in warmer weather that is prone to breakouts and blackheads and I easily get hyperpigmentation (freckles) from the sun.

I generally do not like lotion sunscreens, as they feel heavy (especially mineral sunscreens) and had been using Colorescience Sunforgettable Mineral Powder. I recently saw a photo of different sunscreen types under UV light showing that sunscreen powder applies rather patchy and it is hard to build up, so decided to try lotion sunscreen again. I still like to use mineral powder sunscreen for touch-ups throughout the day over makeup.

The Ordinary Mineral UV Filters is a beige-colored, thick lotion that has an almost mild nutty scent I thought.

Using the general application “rule” of 1/4 teaspoon for the face, I used half that and applied to half my face in the above photos. It is a bit hard to tell with the lighting and angle of the photos, but my skin is noticeably lighter/whiter on the right side. Since the sunscreen is quite heavy, application is not as smooth as I would hope. I’m using Retin A at this time, so there is some flaking and dry patches that the sunscreen seems to “stick” to and application is less smooth in these areas (might be similar for those with quite dry skin). The freckles and uneven color are covered a little and the pores are blurred. After 10 minutes, the sunscreen dries down a bit, but still has some white cast and tackiness that lasts until it is washed off. My cheeks are generally reddish and after application of the sunscreen my daughter asked why my skin was pink. This sunscreen does not sting my eyes. Application is nicer and white cast is a bit less when the sunscreen is applied after a moisturizer (I like Drunk Elephant Protini). Applying sunscreen over half the face, I am able to clearly tell that it feels heavy on the skin.

Above, you can see around my eye where I missed application that shows the color difference.

Above shows a satin finish, light coverage foundation with and without the sunscreen. Not a great makeup day, as I am using Retin-A, but in any case, this foundation applies quite nicely over the sunscreen, it covers the white cast, my skin looks smoother and the pores more blurred on the right side. I also notice throughout the day that my face appears less oily and shiny on the sunscreen side, so similar to a silicone-based primer.

This sunscreen can be a bit hard to wash off (even from my hands after application with a mild hand soap), but I did get a good result with The Ordinary Squalane Cleanser.

I’ve been using The Ordinary Suncare for a couple months now and haven’t gotten any unusual breakouts and my skin doesn’t feel dry with use (I don’t think it feels more hydrated either). I noticed a couple more freckles, which could be because I don’t always apply first thing in the morning when walking the dog or when staying inside.

Before purchasing the Ordinary Suncare, I had been using NIOD’s Survival 30 which I liked much more in terms of application, feeling on the skin and white cast.

I would repurchase The Ordinary Suncare despite a bit of white cast (it doesn’t bother me too much and mineral sunscreens are generally going to have some level of white cast) and heavy feeling; though perhaps when working with clients, would wear makeup over it.

Thank you for reading.

Colorescience Sunforgettable Sunscreen Review

Before getting a skin consultation in my early 30s and really starting to look at what my skin needed, I never wore sunscreen. I don’t burn easily, so figured I didn’t need it. Clearly, I was very wrong; everyone needs to wear sunscreen and I have hyperpigmentation and aging caused by the sun (I just thought they were normal freckles). So of course I needed to buy sunscreen, but didn’t want just makeup or powder with SPF and I didn’t want a cream or lotion as they feel heavy on my skin and are difficult to reapply especially with makeup on. The Sunforgettable SPF 50 loose mineral sunscreen from Colorescience with the brush is the first facial sunscreen I bought (they updated their packaging in February 2017 so looks different from my photo, but still uses the same ingredients). I use the SPF 50 brush-on in the medium shade.

Ingredients for Medium shade (SPF 50)
Active Ingredients:
Titanium Dioxide 23.9%; Zinc Oxide 24.1%

Inactive Ingredients:
Mica, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Lithothamnion Calcareum Extract, Mannitol, Methicone, Dimethicone, Calcium Silicate, Triethoxycaprylylsilane, Sodium Sulfate, Laureth-4, Diatomaceous Earth, Zinc Sulfate, Chromium Oxide Greens (CI 77288), Iron Oxides (CI 77491, CI 77492, CI 77499)

This is a lightweight powder mineral sunscreen using titanium dioxide and zinc oxide that sits on top the skin to reflect/deflect the sun’s rays to offer UVA and UVB protection. These are called physical sunscreens or physical blockers. Mica is a fine powder used for coloring in cosmetics. Dimethicone/vinyl dimethicone crosspolymer, methicone and dimethicone are silicones. Methicone creates a barrier that prevents sweat and oil from shining through. Dimethicone forms a hydrating barrier on the skin. I’m only assuming these work similarly in powder form as with this sunscreen. Calcium silicate is used as an absorbent or a bulking ingredient and is opacifying. Triethoxycaprylylsilane can work as a binder and emulsifier and has silicone components that allow pigments to disperse well. Sodium sulfate is an inorganic salt. It’s used to increase the thickness of the water portion of a product, so not too sure how this translates to a powder product. Laureth-4 is used as a cleansing agent and/or enhances texture. Diatomaceous earth is fossilized remains of tiny water organisms called diatoms. Their skeletons are made of silica that collect in the sediment of rivers and lakes. Zinc sulfate helps inhibit growth of bacteria. Chromium oxide greens and iron oxides are used as pigments.

To apply, I tap the brush on my hand to get the product in the brush, and then apply to the face and neck in small circles. As with any sunscreen, directions say to reapply every 2 hours. It didn’t look like makeup when it was applied; I couldn’t really even tell it was on unless I looked at a mirror up close. It was easy to reapply through the day and over makeup (the makeup look wasn’t affected by the sunscreen). When I first used this product a few years ago it was summer and I was using Retin-A at night, so it was very important to apply sunscreen as Retin-A makes skin more sensitive to the sun. The Sunforgettable brush-on mineral sunscreen worked well. My skin didn’t burn or get more hyperpigmentation.

I’ve been using this sunscreen for a few years now and at my last purchase had asked for a refill, only to be told that the company discontinued the refills as customers found that over time the brush would become clogged with product and the minerals wouldn’t dispense easily. That was my complaint as well. Despite cleaning the brush as instructed (spraying cleaner on a paper towel and swiping the outside of the brush on it) it seemed inevitable that product would get stuck in the brush and the inner brush bristles would become tangled in each other with the bristles feeling scratchy on the skin. I’ve used about half my current jar and the brush is already becoming clogged as there is product that is not removed from the middle of the brush. The brush itself is soft on the skin (when new) and doesn’t lose any fibers. I’ve always been reluctant to wash this brush like I might a makeup brush, as I am worried that water will seep up the brush and get the product wet.

I was hoping to buy this sunscreen with a different delivery system such as a pressed powder (which would be just as convenient and I could have a bit more control over how much is used). I thought they used to have a pressed powder sunscreen on their website, but haven’t been able to find it again. I find it a bit difficult to tell how much product I’m applying with the brush-on, so probably use too much or too little at times. Colorescience says a jar should last 3 months when used as instructed, but I still find this a bit expensive. However, it seems to works and is probably the most convenient sunscreen.

Update (June 16, 2019) – I recently saw a photo of different sunscreen types under UV light showing that sunscreen powder applies rather patchy and it is hard to build up, so decided to try lotion sunscreen again. I still like to use mineral powder sunscreen for touch-ups throughout the day over makeup.

Thank you for reading.